Man pages sections > man1 > geekcode

geekcode - generate geek code block

GEEKCODE(1) Geek User's Manual GEEKCODE(1)

NAME

geekcode - generate geek code block
 

SYNOPSIS

geekcode
 

DESCRIPTION

So you think you are a geek, eh? The first step is to admit to yourself your geekiness. No matter what anyone says, geeks are people too; geeks have rights. So take a deep breath and announce to the world that you are a geek. Your courage will give you strength that will last you forever.
 
How to tell the world you are a geek, you ask? Use the universal Geek code! Using this special code will allow you to let other un-closeted geeks know who you are in a simple, codified statement.
 
The single best way to announce your geekhood is to add your geek code to your signature file or plan and announce it far and wide. But be careful, you may give other geeks the courage to come out of the closet. You might want to hang on to your copy of the code in order to help them along.
 

USAGE

The geek code consists of several categories. Each category is labeled with a letter and some qualifiers. Go through each category and determine which set of qualifiers best describes you in that category. By stringing all of these 'codes' together, you are able to construct your overall geek code. It is this single line of code that will inform other geeks the world over of what a great geek you actually are.
 
Some of the qualifiers will very probably not match with you exactly. It is impossible to cover all possibilities in each category. Simply choose that qualifier that most closely matches you. Also, some activities described in a specific qualifier you may not engage in, while you do engage in others. Each description of each qualifier describes the wide range of activities that apply, so as long as you match with one, you can probably use that qualifier.
 
After you have determined each of your qualifiers, you need to the construct your GEEK CODE BLOCK. Instructions are provided on how to do this towards the end of this file.
 
Also, pay particular attention to case-sensitivity, there can be a big difference between a w and a W.
 

Variables

Geeks can seldom be strictly quantified. To facilitate the fact that within any one category the geek may not be able to determine a specific rating, variables have been designed to allow this range to be included.
 
@
for this variable, said trait is not very rigid, may change with time or with individual interaction. For example, Geeks who happen to very much enjoy Star Trek: The Next Generation, but dislike the old 60's series might list themselves as t++@.
()
for indicating "cross-overs" or ranges. Geeks who go from C+ to C--- depending on the situation (i.e. mostly C+) could use C+(---). @ is different from () in that () has finite limits within the category, while @ ranges all over.
>
for 'wannabe' ratings. Indicating that while the geek is currently at one rating, they are striving to reach another. For example, C++>$ indicating a geek that is currently computer savvy, but wants to someday make money at it.
$
Indicates that this particular category is done for a living. For example, UL+++$ indicates that the person utilizes Unix and gets paid for it. Quite a lucky geek, for sure.
?
Unless stated otherwise within the specific category, the ? is placed after the category identifier and indicates that the geek has no knowledge about that specific category. For example, a person that has never even heard of Babylon 5, would list their Babylon 5 category as 5?
!
Placed BEFORE the category. Unless stated otherwise, indicates that the person refuses to participate in this category. This is unlike the ? variable as the ? indicates lack of knowledge, while the ! indicates stubborn refusal to participate. For example, !E would be a person that just plain refuses to have anything to do with Emacs, while E? would be a person that doesn't even know what Emacs is.
 

Types of Geeks

Geeks come in many flavors. The flavors relate to the vocation (or, if a student, what they are training in) of the particular geek. To start a code, a geek must declare himself or herself to be a geek. To do this, we start the code with a "G" to denote "GEEK", followed by one or two letters to denote the geek's occupation or field of study. Multi-talented geeks with more than one vocational training should denote their myriad of talents with a slash between each vocation (example: GCS/MU/TW).
 
GB
Geek of Business
GC
Geek of Classics
GCA
Geek of Commercial Arts
GCM
Geek of Computer Management
GCS
Geek of Computer Science
GCC
Geek of Communications
GE
Geek of Engineering
GED
Geek of Education
GFA
Geek of Fine Arts
GG
Geek of Government
GH
Geek of Humanities
GIT
Geek of Information Technology
GJ
Geek of Jurisprudence (Law)
GLS
Geek of Library Science
GL
Geek of Literature
GMC
Geek of Mass Communications
GM
Geek of Math
GMD
Geek of Medicine
GMU
Geek of Music
GPA
Geek of Performing Arts
GP
Geek of Philosophy
GS
Geek of Science (Physics, Chemistry, Biology, etc.)
GSS
Geek of Social Science (Psychology, Sociology, etc.)
GTW
Geek of Technical Writing
GO
Geek of Other. Some types of geeks deviate from the normal geek activities. This is encouraged as true geeks come from all walks of life.
GU
Geek of 'Undecided'. This is a popular vocation with incoming freshmen.
G!
Geek of no qualifications. A rather miserable existence, you would think.
GAT
Geek of All Trades. For those geeks that can do anything and everything. GAT usually precludes the use of other vocational descriptors.
 

Appearance

They say you never get a second chance to make a first impression. That seems to be ample justification to invent a time machine; just to play with the minds of the people that make up these silly sayings. Nevertheless, until we completely understand temporal mechanics and can get both a DeLorean and a Flux Capacitor in the same place at the same time at 88 miles an hour, we need to understand that how we look is a mark that will effect us for the rest of our lives, or at least until we change clothes.
 
The Geek, of course, doesn't believe any of that crap. How we look has little to do with what we are inside, and who we are as people. Yet, people still want to know what we look like. Thus, this section allows you to list out all the relevant traits about what you look like on a normal geeky day.
 

Dress

It is said that "clothes make the man". Well, I understood that I was made by a mommy and a daddy (and there's even a category to describe the process below!). Maybe the people who made up that saying aren't being quite that literal...
 
d++
I tend to wear conservative dress such as a business suit or worse, a tie.
d+
Good leisure-wear. Slacks, button-shirt, etc. No jeans, tennis shoes, or t-shirts.
d
I dress a lot like those found in catalog ads. Bland, boring, without life or meaning.
d-
I'm usually in jeans and a t-shirt.
d--
My t-shirts go a step further and have a trendy political message on them.
d---
Punk dresser, including, but not limited to, torn jeans and shirts, body piercings, and prominent tattoos.
dx
Cross Dresser
d?
I have no idea what I am wearing right now, let alone what I wore yesterday.
!d
No clothing. Quite a fashion statement, don't you think?
dpu
I wear the same clothes all the time, no matter the occasion, forgetting to do laundry between wearings.
 

Shape

Geeks come in many shapes and sizes. Shape code is divided into two parts. The first indicates height, while the second indicates roundness. Mix each section to fit yourself. Examples include: s:++, s++:, s++:--.
 
s+++:+++
I usually have to duck through doors/I take up three movie seats.
s++:++
I'm a basketball/linebacker candidate.
s+:+
I'm a little taller/rounder than most.
s:
I'm an average geek
s-:-
I look up to most people. Everyone tells me to gain a few pounds.
s--:--
I look up to damn near everybody. I tend to have to fight against a strong breeze.
s---:---
I take a phone book with me when I go out so I can see to eat dinner. My bones are poking through my skin.
 

Age

The only way to become a true geek is through practice and experience. To this end, your age becomes an important part of your geekiness. Use the qualifiers below to show your age (in Terran years). Also, please use BASE 10 numbers.
 
In addition, if you wish to give your exact age, you can place the number after the 'a' identifier. For example: a42
 
a+++
60 and up
a++
50-59
a+
40-49
a
30-39
a-
25-29
a--
20-24
a---
15-19
a----
10-14
a-----
9 and under (Geek in training?)
a?
immortal
!a
it's none of your business how old I am
 

COMPUTERS

There is a record of geeks that don't use computers. Unfortunately, they are all dead, having lived in an era of no computers. All modern geeks have some exposure to computers. If you don't know what a computer is, you need to go back into your shell.
 

Computers

Most geeks identify themselves by their use of computers and computer networks. In order to quantify your geekiness level on computers, consult the following (consider the term 'computers' synonymous with 'computer network'). This category represents "general" computer aptitude. Categories below will get into specifics.
 
C++++
I'll be first in line to get the new cybernetic interface installed into my skull.
C+++
You mean there is life outside of Internet? You're shittin' me! I haven't dragged myself to class in weeks.
C++
Computers are a large part of my existence. When I get up in the morning, the first thing I do is log myself in. I play games or mud on weekends, but still manage to stay off of academic probation.
C+
Computers are fun and I enjoy using them. I play a mean game of DOOM! and can use a word processor without resorting to the manual too often. I know that a 3.5" disk is not a hard disk. I also know that when it says 'press any key to continue', I don't have to look for a key labeled 'ANY'.
C
Computers are a tool, nothing more. I use it when it serves my purpose.
C-
Anything more complicated than my calculator and I'm screwed.
C--
Where's the on switch?
C---
If you even mention computers, I will rip your head off!
 

UNIX

It seems that a Unix-based operating system is the OS of choice among most geeks. In addition to telling us about your Unix abilities, you can also show which specific Unix OS you are using. To accomplish this, you include a letter showing the brand with your rating. For example: UL++++ would indicate a sysadmin running Linux.
 
B
BSD (use this unless your BSDish system is mentioned below)
L
Linux
U
Ultrix
A
AIX
V
SysV
H
HPUX
I
IRIX
O
OSF/1 (aka Digital Unix)
S
Sun OS/Solaris
C
SCO Unix
X
NeXT